The Book of Threes
Charles Sanders Peirce

C. S. Peirce – Triadism and the Universal Categories

9. Triadism and the Universal Categories Merely to say that Peirce was extremely fond of placing things into groups of three, of trichotomies, and of triadic relations, would fail miserably to do justice to the overwhelming obtrusiveness in his philosophy of the number three. Indeed, he made the most fundamental categories of all “things” of […]

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Peirce, Charles Sanders (1839-1914)

American mathematician who showed that there are only three algebras with a uniquely defined division: those of the real numbers, complex number,  and quaternions. Charles S. Pierce was a mathematician, astronomer, chemist, geodesist, surveyor, cartographer, metrologist, spectroscopist, engineer, inventor; psychologist, philologist, lexicographer, historian of science, mathematical economist, lifelong student of medicine; book reviewer, dramatist, actor, short […]

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Charles Sanders Peirce

Excerpt on Deduction, Induction, and Abduction The most important extension Peirce made of his earliest views on deduction, induction, and abduction involved was to integrate the three argument forms into his view of the scientific method. As so integrated, deduction, induction, and abduction are not simply argument forms any more: they are phases of scientific […]

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C.S. Peirce’s Pragmatism

Peirce’s Early Pragmatism   The earliest clear statement of Peirce’s pragmatism comes from his 1878 paper "How To Make Our Ideas Clear." In this paper, Peirce introduces a maxim, or principle, which allows us to achieve the highest grade of clarity about the concepts we use. Peirce introduces this principle, which we shall discuss in […]

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C.S. Peirce’s Architectonic Philosophy

The subject matter of architectonic is the structure of all human knowledge. The purpose of providing an architectonic scheme is to classify different types of knowledge and explain the relationships that exist between these classifications. Peirce’s own architectonic system divides knowledge according to it status as a "science" and then explains the interrelation of these […]

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