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The Triangles of the Neck

From Grey’s Anatomy

The side of the neck presents a somewhat quadrilateral outline (See figure below), limited, above, by the lower border of the body of the mandible, and an imaginary line extending from the angle of the mandible to the mastoid process; below, by the upper border of the clavicle; in front, by the middle line of the neck; behind, by the anterior margin of the Trapezius. This space is subdivided into two large triangles by the Sternocleidomastoideus, which passes obliquely across the neck, from the sternum and clavicle below, to the mastoid process and occipital bone above. The triangular space in front of this muscle is called the anterior triangle; and that behind it, the posterior triangle.    1

Anterior Triangle.—The anterior triangle is bounded, in front, by the middle line of the neck; behind, by the anterior margin of the Sternocleidomastoideus; its base, directed upward, is formed by the lower border of the body of the mandible, and a line extending from the angle of the mandible to the mastoid process; its apex is below, at the sternum. This space is subdivided into four smaller triangles by the Digastricus above, and the superior belly of the Omohyoideus below. These smaller triangles are named the inferior carotid, the superior carotid, the submaxillary, and the suprahyoid.

 

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