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Dorothy Parker

Dorothy Parker

Dorothy Parker

 

"The ladies men admire, I've heard, Would shudder at a wicked word. Their candle gives a single light; They'd rather stay at home at night. They do not keep awake till three, Nor read erotic poetry. They never sanction the impure, Nor recognize an overture. They shrink from powders and from paints … So far, I've had no complaints.''

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Brown

No man with a man's heart in him, gets far on his way without some bitter, soul searching disappointment. Happy he who is brave enough to push on another stage of the journey, and rest where there are living springs of water, and three score and ten palms.

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Otto von Bismarck

Otto von Bismarck

Otto von Bismarck

 

A really great man is known by three signs… generosity in the design, humanity in the execution, moderation in success.

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Confucius

Confucius

Confucius

 

There are three things which the superior man guards against. In youth…lust. When he is strong…quarrelsomeness. When he is old…covetousness.

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Samuel Butler

Samuel Butler

Samuel Butler

 

The three most important things a man has are, briefly, his private parts, his money, and his religious opinions.

 

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Alphonse Karr

"Every man has three characters – that which he exhibits, that which he has, and that which he thinks he has."

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Beifield’s Principal

The probability of a young man meeting a desirable and receptive young female increases by pyramidical progression when he is already in the company of (1) a date, (2) his wife, (3) a better looking and richer male friend.

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William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare (1564-1616)

William Shakespeare (1564-1616)

William Shakespeare (1564-1616)

 

Three parts of him Is ours already, and the man entire Upon the next encounter yields him ours.

ATTRIBUTION: William Shakespeare (1564–1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassius, in Julius Caesar, act 1, sc. 3, l. 154-6. Using devious means to win the support of Brutus.