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Goldilocks & the Three Bears Playlist

Goldilocks & the Three Bears cartoon - 1935

Origin of Goldilocks story

The story was first recorded in narrative form by British writer and poet Robert Southey, and first published anonymously as “The Story of the Three Bears” in 1837 in a volume of his writings called The Doctor. … The story of the three bears was in circulation before the publication of Southey’s tale.
 

The Goldilocks principle

From the Wikipedia: The Goldilocks principle states that something must fall within certain margins, as opposed to reaching extremes. The Goldilocks principle is derived from a children’s story “The Three Bears” in which a little girl named Goldilocks finds a house owned by three bears.

Storyline

The Story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears
Once upon a time, there was a little girl named Goldilocks. 
She  went for a walk in the forest.  Pretty soon, she came upon a house. 
She knocked and, when no one answered, she walked right in.

At the table in the kitchen, there were three bowls of porridge. 
Goldilocks was hungry.  She tasted the porridge from the first bowl.
"This porridge is too hot!" she exclaimed.
So, she tasted the porridge from the second bowl.
"This porridge is too cold," she said
So, she tasted the last bowl of porridge.
"Ahhh, this porridge is just right," she said happily and
she ate it all up.
After she'd eaten the three bears' breakfasts she decided
she was feeling a little tired. 
So, she walked into the living room where she saw three chairs. 
Goldilocks sat in the first
chair to rest her feet.  
"This chair is too big!" she exclaimed.
So she sat in the second chair.
"This chair is too big, too!"  she whined.
So she tried the last and smallest chair.
"Ahhh, this chair is just right," she sighed. 
But just as she settled down
into the chair to rest, it broke into pieces!
Goldilocks was very tired by this time,
so she went upstairs to the bedroom. 
She lay down in the first bed, but it was too hard. 
Then she lay in the second bed,
but it was too soft.  Then she lay down in the third bed
and it was just right. 
Goldilocks fell asleep.

As she was sleeping, the three bears came home.
"Someone's been eating my porridge," growled the Papa bear.
"Someone's been eating my porridge," said the Mama bear.
"Someone's been eating my porridge and they ate it all up!"
cried the Baby bear.
"Someone's been sitting in my chair," growled the Papa bear.
"Someone's been sitting in my chair," said the Mama bear.
"Someone's been sitting in my chair and they've broken it all to pieces,"
cried the Baby bear.

They decided to look around some more and when they got upstairs
to the bedroom,
Papa bear growled,
"Someone's been sleeping in my bed,"
"Someone's been sleeping in my bed, too" said the Mama bear
"Someone's been sleeping in my bed and she's still there!"
exclaimed Baby bear.

Just then, Goldilocks woke up and saw the three bears. 
She screamed, "Help!" 
And she jumped up and ran out of the room. 
Goldilocks ran down the stairs, opened the door,
and ran away into the forest. 
And she never returned to the home of the three bears.
THE END

Did You Know?

Cast for Hugh Harman Production 1935

June Foray Baby Bear (voice)
Rudolf Ising Papa Bear (voice)
Martha Wentworth Mama Bear (voice)

This is one of three shorts which were created at Disney and animated at MGM’s animation department led by Harman and Ising. Only the first one, “Merbabies,” was released as a Silly Symphony. The other two were then released as Harman and Ising shorts – they were “The Little Goldfish” and this one, “Goldilocks and the Three Bears.” 


Soundtracks

My Grandfather’s Clock
(1876) (uncredited)
Music by Henry Clay Work
The Irish Washerwoman
(uncredited)
Traditional
Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush
(uncredited)
Traditional

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Gentle Giant – Three Friends

Gentle Giant

Studio Album, released in 1972

Songs / Tracks Listing

Gentle Giant – Three Friends (Full Album) thumbnail
  1. Prologue (6:12)
  2. Schooldays (7:33)
  3. Working All Day (5:07)
  4. Peel The Paint (7:25)
  5. Mister Class And Quality? (5:51)
  6. Three Friends (3:00)

Total Time: 35:08

Bonus Tracks on 2011 Alucard remaster:
7. Prologue (Live) (5:53) *
8. Out-Takes (6:21) :
-a Peel The Paint (Studio Rehearsal)
-b Peel The Paint (Alternative Guitar Solo)
-c Three Friends (Soloed Vocal Chorus)

  • Recorded at the Municipal Auditorium, New Orleans, June 1972

Line-up / Musicians

  • Derek Shulman / lead vocals (3-6)
  • Gary Green / guitars (w/ echoplex on track 4 solo), mandolin (2), tambourine (2,5)
  • Kerry Minnear / piano , electric piano, Hammond (1,3-6), Mellotron (2,6), MiniMoog (1,4,6), clavinet (2,3), electric harpsichord & vibraphone (2), bongos triangle (2), lead vocals (2,6)
  • Phil Schulman / tenor (1,3,4) & baritone (1,3) saxes, lead vocals (1,2,4,6)
  • Ray Shulman / bass, fuzz bass (1), acoustic (4) & electric (5) violins, 12-string guitar (1), vocals (6)
  • Malcolm Mortimore / drums, concert snare & hi-hat & bass drum (2)

With:
– Calvin Shulman (Ray’s son) / boy’s voice (2)

Releases information

Artwork: Rick Breach (US editions on Columbia label use an adaptation of 1st album’s cover)

LP Vertigo 6360 070 (1972, UK)
LP Columbia – KC 31649 (1972, USA) Different cover art

CD Columbia ‎- 31649 (1989, US) Different cover art
CD Alucard ‎- ALU-GG-034 (2011, US) Remastered by Fred Kevorkian w/ 2 bonus tracks

 

Gentle Giant-Three Friends Full-Album

Gentle Giant - Three Friends
Gentle Giant – Three Friends
Gentle Giant-Three Friends Full-Album
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Buckminster Fuller explains threeness in the Universe

Buckminster Fuller

Buckminster Fuller
Buckminster Fuller

Buckminster Fuller

  1. The stability of the triangle
  2. The one quantum created in the tetrahedron
  3. How the icosahedron, the octahedron and tetrahedron create everything in the universe

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The Threepenny Opera

The 3 Penny Opera-C W Pabst

The Threepenny Opera (Mack the Knife)

Kurt Weill/Bertolt Brecht

Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill’s The Threepenny Opera is a masterpiece of musical theater that grew out of its writers’ experience of Weimar Germany, the period between the World Wars when Germany struggled to establish a working democracy in the face of economic malaise and the bitterness of military defeat.

First performed  in Berlin in 1928, Brecht’s text is sardonic and brittle. He creates a world of beggars, thieves, and prostitutes in which there is no honor; every character would sell out any other if an advantage is to be gained.

A man who sees another man on a street corner with only a stump for an arm will be so shocked the first time he’ll give him sixpence. But the second time it’ll only be a threepenny bit. And if he sees him a third time, he’ll have him cold-bloodedly handed over to the police.

(By not so surprising chance, those lines function nicely as a precis of the 1990s relationship of American municipalities to the homeless.)

threepenny opera movie-poster
threepenny opera movie-poster

Macheath (“Mack the Knife”) heads up the thieves division. His men tremble before him, he’s got the police well greased, and women compete for his sexual attentions. He has impregnated his lover, Lucy, he marries Peachum’s daughter Polly, and he still has a passionate connection with hooker Jenny.

For this cynical scenario, Weill wrote a score that has become part of Western culture’s consciousness: jazzy, syncopated, dissonant, and full of inventive melody, it captures the essence of the mocking, ironic tone of the book.

The Threepenny Opera is a highly stylized piece. It is not a show about production values. On the contrary, it is the kind of show that, if performed with the right tone and the appropriate sense of style, could be done effectively on a bare stage.

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One, Two, Three

Wilder - One Two Three - 1961

One, Two, Three Movie by Billy Wilder (1961)

One, Two, Three

One, Two, Three

Cast: James Cagney, Horst Buchholz, Arlene Francis, Pamela Tiffin; DIRECTED BY: Billy Wilder; WRITTEN BY: Billy Wilder, I.A.L. Diamond; CINEMATOGRAPHY BY: Daniel F. Fapp; MUSIC BY: Andre Previn. PRODUCER: United Artists. Cagney, an American Coca-Cola exec in Germany, zealously pursues any opportunity to run Coke’s European operations.

In his last starring film (it was supposed to be his last film, but Ragtime came along in 1981), James Cagney plays Coca-Cola executive C.R. MacNamara. Assigned to manage Coke’s West Berlin office, MacNamara dreams of being transferred to London, and to do this he must curry favor with his Atlanta-based boss, Hazeltine (Howard St. John).

Thus, MacNamara agrees to look after Hazeltine’s dizzy, impulsive daughter, Scarlett (Pamela Tiffin), during her visit to Germany. Weeks pass, and on the eve of Hazeltine’s visit to West Berlin, Scarlett announces that she’s gotten married. Even worse, her husband is a hygienically challenged East Berlin Communist named Otto Piffl (Horst Buchholz). The crafty MacNamara arranges for Piffl to be arrested by the East Berlin police and to have the marriage annulled, only to discover that Scarlett is pregnant.

In rapid-fire “one, two, three” fashion, MacNamara must arrange for Piffl to be released by the Communists and successfully pass off the scrungy, doggedly anti-capitalist Piffl as an acceptable husband for Scarlett. MacNamara must accomplish this in less than 12 hours, all the while trying to mollify his wife (Arlene Francis), who has learned of his affair with busty secretary Ingeborg (Lilo Pulver).

Seldom pausing for breath, Billy Wilder’s film is a crackling, mile-a-minute farce, taking satiric scattershots at Coca-Cola, the Cold War (the film is set in the months just before the erection of the Berlin Wall), Russian red tape, Communist and capitalist hypocrisy, Southern bigotry, the German “war guilt,” rock music, and even Cagney’s own movie image.

One Two Three-End Title Card
One Two Three – End Title Card

Not all the gags are in the best of taste, and most of the one-liners have dated rather badly, but Cagney’s mesmerizing performance holds the whole affair together. Billy Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond adapted their screenplay from an obscure play by Ferenc Molnár. Watch for Red Buttons in an unbilled cameo as a military policeman, and listen for the voice of Sig Rumann, emanating from the mouth of actor Hubert Von Meyerinck (the Count von Droste-Schattenburg).

~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide