Category Archives: Philosophy

The quest for greater unity and truth is achieved by the famous dialectic, positing something (thesis), denying it (antithesis), and combining the two half-truths  (synthesis) which contains a greater portion of truth in its complexity.

Ram Dass 

Ram Dass
“I’ve died and been reborn so many times in this life. In the ’50s, I was a professor at Harvard and then I died from that and I became, with Timothy Leary, part of the ‘turn on, tune in, and drop out’ messianic whatever-it-was in the ’60s. This was a whole different incarnation. And then that ended. I went to India and I came back with beads, a long beard, and white robe, Baba Ram Dass, a spiritual teacher, more or less an Indian guru. But then I died from that. In the late ’70s and ’80s it was the Seva Foundation: hospitals in Nepal, India, and Guatemala, a work of service. And then the stroke happened. If I think back to my old life–my golf clubs in the closet, my cello in the living room–if I think that I’m the person who plays music on that cello, I would really suffer and be so sorry for myself. But I’m not him. He died. Now I’ve been born again into this disabled body. This is who I am now. You have to take the curriculum as it comes to you.”

~Ram Dass

Maharajji said to me, “Love everyone, serve everyone, and remember God.” …and I have been trying to do what he told me.

Number 3 in American Culture

THE NUMBER THREE IN AMERICAN CULTURE

By the late Professor Alan Dundes of the University of California at Berkeley

Allan Dundes

Professor Allan Dundes

Students undertaking professional training in anthropology are rarely, if ever, required to formally study their own cultures. They must demonstrate competence in various topics and areas, but these do not normally include materials from their own cultures. They may be told that the identification and careful delineation of native categories may be crucial to a fuller understanding of that culture which they investigate, but their own native categories, the identification of which is equally important for an understanding of another culture, may not be considered at all. With our present knowledge of the cultural relativity of perception and cognition, it seems clear that students of anthropology should be encouraged to analyze their own native categories with the same care and methodological rigor that is demanded of them in their fieldwork in other cultures. If the reduction of ethnocentric bias is truly an ideal of anthropological scholarship, then anthropologists should go into the field with as comprehensive an understanding of the nature of their own culture as possible.

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The Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

Martin Luther Knig Jr.Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

Speech Text:

I want to use as the subject from which to preach: “The Three Dimensions of a Complete Life.” (All right) You know, they used to tell us in Hollywood that in order for a movie to be complete, it had to be three-dimensional. Well, this morning I want to seek to get over to each of us that if life itself is to be complete, (Yes) it must be three-dimensional. . .

Three Sound Clips from the speech:

Audio of Complete Speech

Three Dimensions of a Compete Life

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THE MOUSAI

Muse with barbiton, Paestan red-figure lekanis C4th B.C., Musée du Louvre
Muse with barbiton, Paestan red-figure lekanis C4th B.C., Musée du Louvre

THE MOUSAI (Muses) were the goddesses of music, song and dance, and the source of inspiration to poets. They were also goddesses of knowledge, who remembered all things that had come to pass. Later the Mousai were assigned specific artistic spheres: Kalliope (Calliope), epic poetry; Kleio (Clio), history; Ourania (Urania), astronomy; Thaleia (Thalia), comedy; Melpomene, tragedy; Polymnia (Polyhymnia), religious hymns; Erato, erotic poetry; Euterpe, lyric poetry; and Terpsikhore (Terpsichore), choral song and dance.

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Sukha, Dukha, and Anandam – happiness

Sukha, Dukha, and Anandam – happiness
Sukha, Dukha, and Anandam – happiness

There are different forms of happiness. There is sukha, happiness derived from worldly successes, worldly exchanges. This happiness, sukha, is fleeting because always dukha, or sorrow, comes along next. In the one hand is happiness, sukha and in the other hand is sorrow, dukha. They are ever going from one to the other but there is another type of happiness that is not qualified in the same way as sukha and that isanandam. Anandam is bliss eternal and does not have these qualifications. It has no opposite expression. The bliss eternal, anandam, is not associated with any particular time, place, or person. It has its own existence and it no opposite. This happiness does not derive from the achievement of anything.

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Trinity > History of Trinitarian Doctrines (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

trinity
trinity
Partial Article, see full article in Source.

Many Christian apologists argue that the doctrine of the Trinity is “biblical” (i.e. either it is implicitly taught there, or it is the best explanation of what is taught there) using three sorts of arguments. They begin by claiming that the Father of Jesus Christ is the one true God taught in the Old Testament. They then argue that given what the Bible teaches about Christ and the Holy Spirit, they must be “fully divine” as well. Thus, we must, as it were, “move them within” the nature of the one God. Therefore, there are three fully divine persons “in God”. While this may be paradoxical, it is argued that this is what God has revealed to humankind through the Bible.

The types of arguments employed to show the “full divinity” of Christ and the Holy Spirit work as follows.

  1. S did action A.
  2. For any x, if x does action A, x is fully divine.
  3. Therefore, S is fully divine.

E.g., A = non-culpably pronouncing the forgiveness of sins, non-culpably receiving worship, raising the dead, truly saying “Before Abraham was, I am”, creating the cosmos. Continue reading Trinity > History of Trinitarian Doctrines (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

Palm Reading – Major Hand Lines

Palm Lines
Palm Lines

There are three major lines on your palm. These include the

  1. heart line
  2. head line
  3. life line

Basically, the major hand lines represent

  1. emotional energy (heart line)
  2. mental energy (head line)
  3. physical energy (life line)

In simple terms, body, mind and soul. They are found on every hand, even if the heart line and head line are sometimes merged into one line, called the simian line.

Kathleen E. Keogh, Vedic Palmist-Astrologer, gives wonderful insights on the major hand lines in this video.

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Alan Watts

Alan Watts
Alan Watts

“The only way to make sense out of change is to plunge into it, move with it, and join the dance.”

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Time Travel

back to the future June 11, 2015
back to the future June 11, 2015

What is ‘time travel’? One standard definition is that of David Lewis’s: an object time travels iff the difference between its departure and arrival times in the surrounding world does not equal the duration of the journey undergone by the object. This definition applies to both natural and Wellsian time travel.

Flux Capacitor
Flux Capacitor

For example, Jane might be a time traveler if she travels for one hour but arrives two hours later in the future (or two hours earlier in the past). In both types of time travel, the times experienced by a time traveler are different from the time undergone by their surrounding world.

But what do we mean by the ‘time’ in time travel?

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