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Ram Dass 

Ram Dass
“I’ve died and been reborn so many times in this life. In the ’50s, I was a professor at Harvard and then I died from that and I became, with Timothy Leary, part of the ‘turn on, tune in, and drop out’ messianic whatever-it-was in the ’60s. This was a whole different incarnation. And then that ended. I went to India and I came back with beads, a long beard, and white robe, Baba Ram Dass, a spiritual teacher, more or less an Indian guru. But then I died from that. In the late ’70s and ’80s it was the Seva Foundation: hospitals in Nepal, India, and Guatemala, a work of service. And then the stroke happened. If I think back to my old life–my golf clubs in the closet, my cello in the living room–if I think that I’m the person who plays music on that cello, I would really suffer and be so sorry for myself. But I’m not him. He died. Now I’ve been born again into this disabled body. This is who I am now. You have to take the curriculum as it comes to you.”

~Ram Dass

Maharajji said to me, “Love everyone, serve everyone, and remember God.” …and I have been trying to do what he told me.

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Number 3 in American Culture

Three American Flags by Jasper Johns

THE NUMBER THREE IN AMERICAN CULTURE

By the late Professor Alan Dundes of the University of California at Berkeley

Allan Dundes

Professor Allan Dundes

Students undertaking professional training in anthropology are rarely, if ever, required to formally study their own cultures. They must demonstrate competence in various topics and areas, but these do not normally include materials from their own cultures. They may be told that the identification and careful delineation of native categories may be crucial to a fuller understanding of that culture which they investigate, but their own native categories, the identification of which is equally important for an understanding of another culture, may not be considered at all. With our present knowledge of the cultural relativity of perception and cognition, it seems clear that students of anthropology should be encouraged to analyze their own native categories with the same care and methodological rigor that is demanded of them in their fieldwork in other cultures. If the reduction of ethnocentric bias is truly an ideal of anthropological scholarship, then anthropologists should go into the field with as comprehensive an understanding of the nature of their own culture as possible.

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THE MOUSAI

The Mousia
Muse with barbiton, Paestan red-figure lekanis C4th B.C., Musée du Louvre
Muse with barbiton, Paestan red-figure lekanis C4th B.C., Musée du Louvre

THE MOUSAI (Muses) were the goddesses of music, song and dance, and the source of inspiration to poets. They were also goddesses of knowledge, who remembered all things that had come to pass. Later the Mousai were assigned specific artistic spheres: Kalliope (Calliope), epic poetry; Kleio (Clio), history; Ourania (Urania), astronomy; Thaleia (Thalia), comedy; Melpomene, tragedy; Polymnia (Polyhymnia), religious hymns; Erato, erotic poetry; Euterpe, lyric poetry; and Terpsikhore (Terpsichore), choral song and dance.

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Sukha, Dukha, and Anandam – happiness

Sukha, Dukha, and Anandam – happiness
Sukha, Dukha, and Anandam – happiness
Sukha, Dukha, and Anandam – happiness

There are different forms of happiness. There is sukha, happiness derived from worldly successes, worldly exchanges. This happiness, sukha, is fleeting because always dukha, or sorrow, comes along next. In the one hand is happiness, sukha and in the other hand is sorrow, dukha. They are ever going from one to the other but there is another type of happiness that is not qualified in the same way as sukha and that isanandam. Anandam is bliss eternal and does not have these qualifications. It has no opposite expression. The bliss eternal, anandam, is not associated with any particular time, place, or person. It has its own existence and it no opposite. This happiness does not derive from the achievement of anything.

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Trinity > History of Trinitarian Doctrines (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

trinity
trinity
trinity
Partial Article, see full article in Source.

Many Christian apologists argue that the doctrine of the Trinity is “biblical” (i.e. either it is implicitly taught there, or it is the best explanation of what is taught there) using three sorts of arguments. They begin by claiming that the Father of Jesus Christ is the one true God taught in the Old Testament. They then argue that given what the Bible teaches about Christ and the Holy Spirit, they must be “fully divine” as well. Thus, we must, as it were, “move them within” the nature of the one God. Therefore, there are three fully divine persons “in God”. While this may be paradoxical, it is argued that this is what God has revealed to humankind through the Bible.

The types of arguments employed to show the “full divinity” of Christ and the Holy Spirit work as follows.

  1. S did action A.
  2. For any x, if x does action A, x is fully divine.
  3. Therefore, S is fully divine.

E.g., A = non-culpably pronouncing the forgiveness of sins, non-culpably receiving worship, raising the dead, truly saying “Before Abraham was, I am”, creating the cosmos. Continue reading Trinity > History of Trinitarian Doctrines (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

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Palm Reading – Major Hand Lines

Palm Lines
Palm Lines

What are the lines on the palm of your hand?

Palmistry with the meaning of palm reading or hand prediction is to learn a person’s personalities, fortune and future by analyzing his/her hands. It is also called Chiromancy. In fact, palmistry not only refers to the reading of one’s hand or palm, it also includes the reading of arm, finger and fingernail.
There are three major lines on your palm
These include the:
  1. heart line
  2. head line
  3. life line

The major hand lines represent

  1. emotional energy (heart line)
  2. mental energy (head line)
  3. physical energy (life line)

In simple terms, body, mind and soul. They are found on every hand, even if the heart line and head line are sometimes merged into one line, called the simian line.

In the video, Andrew Mason explains hand topography, all the lines on the palm and what to expect from his book, Vedic Palmistry.

Andrew Mason Explains Vedic Palmistry

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Alan Watts

Alan Watts
Alan Watts
Alan Watts

“The only way to make sense out of change is to plunge into it, move with it, and join the dance.”

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Time Travel

back to the future June 10, 2015
back to the future June 11, 2015
back to the future June 11, 2015

What is ‘time travel’? One standard definition is that of David Lewis’s: an object time travels iff the difference between its departure and arrival times in the surrounding world does not equal the duration of the journey undergone by the object. This definition applies to both natural and Wellsian time travel.

Flux Capacitor
Flux Capacitor

For example, Jane might be a time traveler if she travels for one hour but arrives two hours later in the future (or two hours earlier in the past). In both types of time travel, the times experienced by a time traveler are different from the time undergone by their surrounding world.

But what do we mean by the ‘time’ in time travel?

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Bauhaus

On the roof of the Bauhaus building, Dessau, 1928. From left: Josef Albers, Marcel Breuer, Gunta Stölzl, Oskar Schlemmer, Wassily Kandinsky, Walter Gropius, Herbet Bayer, Lazslo Moholoy-Nagy, Hinnerk Scheper
Benoit Bodhuin-triangle-font
Benoit Bodhuin-triangle-font
On the roof of the Bauhaus building, Dessau, 1928. From left: Josef Albers, Marcel Breuer, Gunta Stölzl, Oskar Schlemmer, Wassily Kandinsky, Walter Gropius, Herbet Bayer, Lazslo Moholoy-Nagy, Hinnerk Scheper
On the roof of the Bauhaus building, Dessau, 1928.
From left: Josef Albers, Marcel Breuer, Gunta Stölzl,
Oskar Schlemmer, Wassily Kandinsky, Walter Gropius,
Herbet Bayer, Lazslo Moholoy-Nagy, Hinnerk Scheper

The Bauhaus was the most influential modernist art school of the 20th century, one whose approach to teaching, and understanding art’s relationship to society and technology, had a major impact both in Europe and the United States long after it closed. It was shaped by the 19th and early 20th centuries trends such as Arts and Crafts movement, which had sought to level the distinction between fine and applied arts, and to reunite creativity and manufacturing.

2 Bauhaus Seals
2 Bauhaus Seals

This is reflected in the romantic medievalism of the school’s early years, in which it pictured itself as a kind of medieval crafts guild. But in the mid 1920s the medievalism gave way to a stress on uniting art and industrial design, and it was this which ultimately proved to be its most original and important achievement. The school is also renowned for its faculty, which included artists Wassily KandinskyJosef Albers,László Moholy-NagyPaul Klee and Johannes Itten, architects Walter Gropius andLudwig Mies van der Rohe, and designer Marcel Breuer.

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the story of tidbit – narrated by Kasey Wells

Published on Mar 17, 2015

http://thestoryoftidbit.weebly.com/

the story of tidbit was written to be a THEORY OF EVERYTHING and a MODERN CREATION MYTH in one… a visual adventure searching the origins of the UNIVERSE and the essence of GOD.

the story of tidbit follows the inception and evolution of polarized MATTER and LIFE as they are perpetually propelled around and through the magnetic fields and neutral positions that bind/intertwine them.

Scoped by scientific and spiritual principles the story of tidbit recognizes the infinite value of neutral both atomically and philosophically.

Dedicated to THE PURSUIT OF TRUTH, EQUALITY, and ACHIEVING NEUTRALITY.

 

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Hegel and the Trinity

hegel dialectic
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel

“thesis, antithesis, synthesis”

Peter Benson explains why Hegel was obsessed with the number three.

One of the best known popularizers of philosophy in Britain is Bryan Magee. Many people will fondly recall his illuminating series of interviews with philosophers for radio and television. So his lavishly illustrated book The Story of Philosophy (Dorling Kindersley, 2001) will attract many readers eager to learn more about the subject. Nor will they be disappointed, for it contains a wealth of information and useful summaries of philosophical ideas.

hegel dialectic
hegel-dialectic

Nevertheless, I want to draw attention to a significant error in his chapter on Hegel (admittedly a notoriously difficult philosopher). The error is important because it represents a widespread misunderstanding of Hegel’s thought. Quite rightly, Magee emphasizes that, for Hegel, “everything — ideas, religion, the arts, the sciences, the economy, institutions, society itself — is always changing.” But he then goes on to say that Hegel “produced a vocabulary to describe [this process]. The process as a whole he called the dialectical process, or just the dialectic, and he analysed it as made up of three main stages …. thesis, antithesis, synthesis.”

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C. S. Peirce – Triadism and the Universal Categories

Charles Sanders Peirce
sign aspects
sign aspects

9. Triadism and the Universal Categories

Merely to say that Peirce was extremely fond of placing things into groups of three, of trichotomies, and of triadic relations, would fail miserably to do justice to the overwhelming obtrusiveness in his philosophy of the number three.

Indeed, he made the most fundamental categories of all “things” of any sort whatsoever the categories of “Firstness,” “Secondness,” and “Thirdness,” and he often described “things” as being “firsts” or “seconds” or “thirds.”

Charles Sanders Peirce
Charles Sanders Peirce

For example, with regard to the trichotomy “possibility,” “actuality,” and “necessity,” possibility he called a first, actuality he called a second, and necessity he called a third. Again: quality was a first, fact was a second, and habit (or rule or law) was a third. Again: entity was a first, relation was a second, and representation was a third. Again: rheme (by which Peirce meant a relation of arbitrary adicity or arity) was a first, proposition was a second, and argument was a third.

The list goes on and on. Let us refer to Peirce’s penchant for describing things in terms of trichotomies and triadic relations as Peirce’s “triadism.”

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