Posted on

Lactantius

Lactantius
Lactantius
Lactantius

“Cicero, in his treatise concerning the Nature of the Gods, having said that three Jupiters were enumerated by theologians, adds that the third was of Crete, the son of Saturn, and that his tomb is shown in that island.”

Advertisements
Posted on Leave a comment

Buckminster Fuller explains threeness in the Universe

Buckminster Fuller
Buckminster Fuller
Buckminster Fuller

Buckminster Fuller

  1. The stability of the triangle
  2. The one quantum created in the tetrahedron
  3. How the icosahedron, the octahedron and tetrahedron create everything in the universe
Posted on

The Three Umpires

Give me a break ump!

Three Blind UmpiresThree Blind Umpires

One weekend the junior umpire, the senior umpire, and the master of all umpires got together to discuss their craft.

After hours and hours of deliberation and thoughtful discussion, the junior umpire stands up and he says “I call ‘em the way I see ‘em“.

The other umpires nod, but then the senior umpire stands up and he says “I call ‘em the way they are”.

The room is silent. Finally, the master of all umpires says “Gentlemen, they ain’t nothing till I call ‘em”.


The Three Umpires by Norman Rockwell
The Three Umpires by Norman Rockwell

Tough Call – also known as Game Called Because of Rain, Bottom of the Sixth, or The Three Umpires – is a 1948 painting by American artist Norman Rockwell, painted for the April 23, 1949, cover of The Saturday Evening Post magazine.

Robert M Woods

Among the many conversations I have had with Great Books students over the years, none is more lively than when we discuss various theories of truth.

It seems to always come up when we are reading and talking about Thomas Aquinas’s Summa. In order to make immediate connection with them, I tell the story about three umpires in a bar after a game. These officials are discussing what really happens when they call balls and strikes. What they are really doing is discussing the relationship between reality and human apprehension of said reality.
The umpires are discussing the relationship between the pitching of the ball and the calling of said pitch by the umpire. It goes like this:

1) When it comes to making calls behind the home plate, I call it the way it is….
2) When it comes to making calls behind home plate, I call it the way I see it….
3) When it comes to making calls behind home plate, it ain’t nothing until I call it….

1) Is it possible that this umpire would ever admit to being wrong?

2) Is the reality of the ball and strike rooted in the perception of the umpire?

3) What if the pitcher threw the ball twenty feet over the catcher’s head and it struck the press box and the umpire called it a strike, it would be, but he would be fired–why?

Those of us who have played or enjoyed the game of baseball get the import of this conversation. The truth is that it is easy to hear what each is saying and recognize the legitimacy of their respective claim. Additionally, it is also relatively easy to extrapolate from their statements and expand them to the point of seeing how wrong they are in their claim.

Source:http://www.theimaginativeconservative.org/author/robert-m-woods

Posted on

The Three Laws of NOW

Burt Harding

By Burt Harding

Three Laws of NOW

Burt Harding, founder of the Awareness Foundation in Vancouver, offers a radical invitation to recognize the truth of our being as already whole and fulfilled.

He reminds us of the love we really are beyond the personal stories we carry. In this way, we come to recognize what we have always known but did not live from – the beauty and wonder of our own true essence.

Burt conducts sessions and workshops in Supersentience, a system devised to help heal deep wounds and promote a shift in the perception of who we really are.

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kOZj4IIRDMw

 

Posted on

We Only Fall In Love With 3 People In Our Lifetime—Each One For A Specific Reason

Falling in Love

Love the 1st Time: The Love that Looks Right

Can't help falling in love
Can’t help falling in love

It’s been said that we really only fall in love with three people in our lifetime. Yet, it’s also believed that we need each of these loves for a different reason.

Often our first is when we are young, in high school even. It’s the idealistic love—the one that seems like the fairy tales we read as children.

This is the love that appeals to what we should be doing for society’s sake—and probably our families. We enter into it with the belief that this will be our only love and it doesn’t matter if it doesn’t feel quite right, or if we find ourselves having to swallow down our personal truths to make it work because deep down we believe that this is what love is supposed to be.

Falling In Love the 2nd Time: The Hard Love

The second is supposed to be our hard love—the one that teaches us lessons about who we are and how we often want or need to be loved. This is the kind of love that hurts, whether through lies, pain or manipulation.

We think we are making different choices than our first, but in reality we are still making choices out of the need to learn lessons—but we hang on. Our second love can become a cycle, oftentimes one we keep repeating because we think that somehow the ending will be different than before. Yet, each time we try, it somehow ends worse than before.

Sometimes it’s unhealthy, unbalanced or narcissistic even. There may be emotional, mental or even physical abuse or manipulation—most likely there will be high levels of drama. This is exactly what keeps us addicted to this story line, because it’s the emotional roller coaster of extreme highs and lows and like a junkie trying to get a fix, we stick through the lows with the expectation of the high.

With this kind of love, trying to make it work becomes more important than whether it actually should.

It’s the love that we wished was right.

Falling In Love the 3rd Time: The Love that Lasts

And the third is the love we never see coming. The one that usually looks all wrong for us and that destroys any lingering ideals we clung to about what love is supposed to be. This is the love that comes so easy it doesn’t seem possible. It’s the kind where the connection can’t be explained and knocks us off our feet because we never planned for it.

This is the love where we come together with someone and it just fits—there aren’t any ideal expectations about how each person should be acting, nor is there pressure to become someone other than we are.

We are just simply accepted for who we are already—and it shakes to our core.

It isn’t what we envisioned our love would look like, nor does it abide by the rules that we had hoped to play it safe by. But still it shatters our preconceived notions and shows us that love doesn’t have to be how we thought in order to be true.

This is the love that keeps knocking on our door regardless of how long it takes us to answer.

It’s the love that just feels right.

Maybe we don’t all experience these loves in this lifetime, but perhaps that’s just because we aren’t ready to. Maybe the reality is we need to truly learn what love isn’t before we can grasp what it is.

Possibly we need a whole lifetime to learn each lesson, or maybe, if we’re lucky, it only takes a few years.

Perhaps it’s not about if we are ever ready for love, but if love is ready for us.

And then there may be those people who fall in love once and find it passionately lasts until their last breath. Those faded and worn pictures of our grandparents who seemed just as in love as they walked hand-in-hand at age 80 as they did in their wedding picture—the kind that leaves us wondering if we really know how to love at all.

Someone once told me they are the lucky ones, and perhaps they are.

But I kinda think that those who make it to their third love are really the lucky ones.

They are the ones who are tired of having to try and whose broken hearts lay beating in front of them wondering if there is just something inherently wrong with how they love.

But there’s not; it’s just a matter of if their partner loves in the same way they do or not.

Just because it has never worked out before doesn’t mean that it won’t work out now.

What it really comes down to is if we are limited by how we love, or instead love without limits. We can all choose to stay with our first love, the one that looks good and will make everyone else happy. We can choose to stay with our second under the belief that if we don’t have to fight for it, then it’s not worth having—or we can make the choice to believe in the third love.

The one that feels like home without any rationale; the love that isn’t like a storm—but rather the quiet peace of the night after.

And maybe there’s something special about our first love, and something heartbreakingly unique about our second…but there’s also just something pretty amazing about our third.

The one we never see coming.
The one that actually lasts.
The one that shows us why it never worked out before.

And it’s that possibility that makes trying again always worthwhile, because the truth is you never know when you’ll stumble into love.

Source:  https://www.elephantjournal.com/2016/11/we-only-fall-in-love-with-3-people-in-our-lifetime-each-one-for-a-specific-reason/
Posted on

Native American Proverb

Native America

Listen to the wind, it talks.

Listen to the silence, it speaks.

Listen to your heart, it knows.”

~Native American Proverb 💞

Posted on Leave a comment

Put Your Palms Together, and Pay Attention to This Little Detail

Palmistry
pamlistry
palmistry

Palmistry is an ancient practice characterized as the ability to tell one’s future through the study of your palm. Dating back to roots of Hindu astrology and Gypsy fortune tellers several thousand years ago, it is now known and practiced worldwide.

Palmistry with the meaning of palm reading or hand prediction is to learn a person’s personalities, fortune and future by analyzing his/her hands. It is also called Chiromancy. In fact, palmistry not only refers to the reading of one’s hand or palm, it also includes the reading of arm, finger and fingernail.

The Heart Line

The heart line (also called love line) is one of the three major lines in palm reading. It’s just above the head line starting from the edge of the palm under the little finger, running across the palm and ending below the middle finger or forefinger or the place where they join.

The heart lines are at the same level

Heart Line same
Heart Line same

If your partner has their love lines on the same level, you’re lucky: they have serious intentions and prefer constant relationships. They’re rational and dislike sharp turns in life.

They are a sensible person with a soft character, and they care about the opinions of others.

Continue reading Put Your Palms Together, and Pay Attention to This Little Detail

Posted on Leave a comment

Buddha

Buddha
Buddha

To enjoy good health, to bring true happiness to one’s family, to bring peace to all, one must first discipline and control one’s own mind. If a man can control his mind he can find the way to Enlightenment, and all wisdom and virtue will naturally come to him. — Buddha

Posted on Leave a comment

Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh

Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh
Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh
“Nonviolence is not a set of techniques that you can learn with your intellect,” he goes on to say. “Nonviolent action arises from the compassion, lucidity and understanding you have within.”

Posted on Leave a comment

Socrates 

Socrates “Strong minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, weak minds discuss people.”

“If you don’t get what you want, you suffer; if you get what you don’t want, you suffer; even when you get exactly what you want, you still suffer because you can’t hold on to it forever. Your mind is your predicament. It wants to be free of change. Free of pain, free of the obligations of life and death. But change is law and no amount of pretending will alter that reality.”

“True wisdom comes to each of us when we realize how little we understand about life, ourselves, and the world around us.”

Posted on Leave a comment

Ram Dass 

Ram Dass
“I’ve died and been reborn so many times in this life. In the ’50s, I was a professor at Harvard and then I died from that and I became, with Timothy Leary, part of the ‘turn on, tune in, and drop out’ messianic whatever-it-was in the ’60s. This was a whole different incarnation. And then that ended. I went to India and I came back with beads, a long beard, and white robe, Baba Ram Dass, a spiritual teacher, more or less an Indian guru. But then I died from that. In the late ’70s and ’80s it was the Seva Foundation: hospitals in Nepal, India, and Guatemala, a work of service. And then the stroke happened. If I think back to my old life–my golf clubs in the closet, my cello in the living room–if I think that I’m the person who plays music on that cello, I would really suffer and be so sorry for myself. But I’m not him. He died. Now I’ve been born again into this disabled body. This is who I am now. You have to take the curriculum as it comes to you.”

~Ram Dass

Maharajji said to me, “Love everyone, serve everyone, and remember God.” …and I have been trying to do what he told me.

Posted on Leave a comment

Number 3 in American Culture

Three American Flags by Jasper Johns

THE NUMBER THREE IN AMERICAN CULTURE

By the late Professor Alan Dundes of the University of California at Berkeley

Allan Dundes

Professor Allan Dundes

Students undertaking professional training in anthropology are rarely, if ever, required to formally study their own cultures. They must demonstrate competence in various topics and areas, but these do not normally include materials from their own cultures. They may be told that the identification and careful delineation of native categories may be crucial to a fuller understanding of that culture which they investigate, but their own native categories, the identification of which is equally important for an understanding of another culture, may not be considered at all. With our present knowledge of the cultural relativity of perception and cognition, it seems clear that students of anthropology should be encouraged to analyze their own native categories with the same care and methodological rigor that is demanded of them in their fieldwork in other cultures. If the reduction of ethnocentric bias is truly an ideal of anthropological scholarship, then anthropologists should go into the field with as comprehensive an understanding of the nature of their own culture as possible.

Continue reading Number 3 in American Culture