Category Archives: Mathematics

Mathematics uses many concepts in threes. The first structure mathematically is a triangle. There are acute, right, and obtuse angles. Trigonometry is the study of the relationship of the sides of a triangle. Have your heard of Pascal's Triangle?

Pythagorean theorem

What do Euclid, 12-year-old Albert Einstein, and American President James A. Garfield have in common?

They all came up with elegant proofs for the famous Pythagorean theorem:

In mathematics, the Pythagorean theorem, also known as Pythagoras’s theorem, is a fundamental relation in Euclidean geometry among the three sides of a right triangle. It states that the square of the hypotenuse (the side opposite the right angle) is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides.

What do Euclid, 12-year-old Albert Einstein, and American President James A. Garfield have in common?

Source:https://www.facebook.com/TEDEducation/videos/1742518602428005/

Scientists just got one of the best measures yet of a fundamental of physics

Beneath three glass bell jars, in a locked vault in the basement of a highly secure facility outside Paris, sits the world’s most important kilogram.

The NIST-4 Kibble balance. The instrument was used to calculate Planck’s constant, an important step toward redefining the kilogram. (Jennifer Lauren Lee/NIST PML)
The NIST-4 Kibble balance. The instrument was used to calculate Planck’s constant, an important step toward redefining the kilogram. (Jennifer Lauren Lee/NIST PML)
Ever since 1889, when the General Conference on Weights and Measures (CGPM) made the imperious pronouncement, “this prototype shall henceforth be considered to be the unit of mass,” this platinum and iridium cylinder has served as the standard by which all other kilograms are measured, from the weights on a high-tech lab scale to the plastic discs high schoolers use in chemistry class. It’s known as “le Grand K,” and it’s afforded the security and scrutiny befitting such a fancy title. Even the researchers who work with it can’t touch it, lest their fingertips wipe away atoms or leave residue on the gleaming surface. The vault containing the cylinder can only be opened by gathering three custodians carrying three different keys, and that’s happened fewer than a dozen times in the kilogram’s 127-year history.  Continue reading Scientists just got one of the best measures yet of a fundamental of physics

Fahrenheit Celsius Kelvins – composite functions

Fahrenheit Celsius Kelvins
Fahrenheit Celsius Kelvins
In 1954, the tenth general conference on weights and measures adopted the Kelvin K as the basic unit for measuring all international weights and measures. While the kelvin is the standard unit, degrees Farenheit and degrees Celsius are still in common use in the United States. 

The function C(F)=5/9(F-32) relates Celsius temperatures and Farenheit Temperatures. The function K(C)= C + 273.15 relates celsius temperatures and kelvin temperatures.

Let’s convert Fahrenheit to Kelvin. The composition of the function K with the function C is 

K(C(F)) = C(F) + 273 = (5/9)(F-32) + 273 

Since C converts Fahrenheit to Celsius and K converts Celsius to Kelvin, the composition will convert Fahrenheit to Kelvin.  

The Rule of Three in Mathematics

rule-of-three-calculator-150x150The Rule of Three is a Mathematical Rule that allows you to solve problems based on proportions. By having three numbers: a, b, c, such that, ( a / b = c / x), (i.e., a: b :: c: x ) you can calculate the unknown number. The Rule of Three Calculator uses the Rule of Three method to calculate the unknown value immediately based on the proportion between two numbers and the third number.

The working of the Rule of Three Calculator can be expressed as follows:

Rule of Three Calculator

Continue reading The Rule of Three in Mathematics

Math is racist: How data is driving inequality


By Aimee Rawlins September 06, 2016 17:24PM ED

These “WMDs,” as she calls them, have three key features: They are opaque, scalable and unfair.

It’s no surprise that inequality in the U.S. is on the rise. But what you might not know is that math is partly to blame.

In a new book, “Weapons of Math Destruction,” Cathy O’Neil details all the ways that math is essentially being used for evil (my word, not hers).

From targeted advertising and insurance to education and policing, O’Neil looks at how algorithms and big data are targeting the poor, reinforcing racism and amplifying inequality.
Continue reading Math is racist: How data is driving inequality