Posted on

Three Finger Challenge

Three Finger Challenge Dividing the Internet
The THREE FINGER CHALLENGE Is Dividing The Internet!

 

Inglorious Bastard's
Inglorious Bastard’s

In the movie Inglorious Bastard’s, the spy, undercover as a German officer, orders another round of whiskey, telling the bartender, “Drei Gläser (three glasses) and holding three fingers up — his index, middle, and ring finger. … A true German would have ordered “three” with the index, middle finger, and thumb extended.

three countries using three fingers
three countries using three fingers

The French also start counting with their thumb for one. For two, they hold up the thumb and index finger. For three, they hold up the thumb, index finger and middle finger. In Costa Rica the three finger ‘OK” sign is used. 

Anti Defamation League says 'OK' hand sign not a white supremacist hate symbol
Anti Defamation League says ‘OK’ hand sign not a white supremacist hate symbol

One of America’s oldest civil rights organizations has said it does not think the thumb and forefinger “OK” hand gesture is a white supremacist sign.

The Anti-Defamtion League (ADL) issued the clarification after two journalists known to be supporters of Donald Trump made the sign while standing behind the podium at the White House press briefing room.

The two reporters vehemently denied they were either white supremacists or that they were making a sign in support of such views. However, the image of them sparked a storm on social media, with some commentators arguing that the symbol was a way to indicate ‘white power’, as reported by The Independent.

What’s Trending – Backstage Conversations Shira Lazar
Shira Lazar - Backstage Conversations
Video Sources: Shira Lazar
Advertisements
Posted on

3-click rule — the magic number – UX Collective

3-click rule — the magic number

A maximum of information in a minimum of words.

UI UX design
UI UX design

This is a particularly deep belief for your graphic designer friends for 10 years, but we have come a long way, and the usability tests have shown it for a while…

I will not lie to you any longer, users of your services will not leave your site or application if they can not find the information they are looking for in 3 clicks.

The number of clicks needed does not affect the success rate and even less the satisfaction of users: the important thing is to have a smooth, easy and understandable navigation (yes, the rules of 3 adjectives affect me too).

The scent of information

The concept is a simple idea and quite primitive as the name suggests : to have a good hunt, you must follow a good smell!

On a website or an application, the smell will take shape with the content, scented with confidence, the right word, the good image.

A little like my previous article about form field (Form fields — Required vs Optional), never forget that the most important thing when designing a product is to give the user the feeling of being in the center of all the expectations.

It’s a bit like setting a trap for a hungry bear, bait him, feed him to your final goal and he will follow you without even realizing it.

The key is your content: put it in value, coated to bring your user to be tempted to immerse himself in it and especially not let him lose The scent of information !

Once lost, the user hesitates, it becomes difficult for him to finish the action, and he will eventually notice the number of clicks you ask him to do.

Do not waste time worrying about the number of clicks, worry about the scent of information.

Disclamer :

I already see the crowd of designer dissatisfied ‘yes that’s fine theory, but when you can do 2 click instead of 6 is better no?’

YES, of course, this article is meant to make you think, to give you concrete information about the different studies done about the 3 clicks rule, but do not get me wrong, when you can do 2 clicks instead of 6 without spoiling the navigation experience, made it, but do not forget The scent of information.

Jordane SamsonJordane Samson
Head of design @gojob - 
#UX provider. For more from jordane sanson and to follow him select the link below: https://medium.com/@JordaneSanson/followers
Posted on

ORM – object relational mapping

Object Relational Mapping
Object Relational Mapping
ORM (Object-relational mapping) in computer science is a programming technique for converting data between incompatible type systems using object-oriented programming languages. This creates, in effect, a “virtual object database” that can be used from within the programming language.
Source: Wikipedia
Posted on

So to speak

You use so to speak to draw attention to the fact that you are describing or referring to something in a way that may be amusing or unusual rather than completely accurate.
I ought not to tell you but I will, since you’re in the family, so to speak.

so to speak

A phrase used to indicate that what one has just said is an uncommon, metaphorical, or original way of saying something. Similar to the phrases “if you will” and “in a manner of speaking.” He was a fixer, so to speak—a man who could get things done. This arrangement will allow us to eliminate our debt and get back to solid ground, so to speak.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Used after sentences to express that there is a metaphor in it. It can be generally interchanged with like-clause: 

It is X, so to speak. 
It is like X.

I love this jacket. I always wear it when I go to work. It is a uniform for me, so to speak.

by terb kund April 28, 2009

UrbanDictionary.com

Posted on

Hebrew: The Metric System of Languages

Tetragrammaton by Francisco Goya: "The Name of God", YHWH in triangle, detail from fresco Adoration of the Name of God, 1772

Guest Post by Bob Canter

Created roughly a century apart, the advent of modern Hebrew and the creation of the Metric System bear several striking similarities.

Hebrew exhibits some of the same logical features as does the Metric System. The primary logical structure of Hebrew is the three-letter root system which forms the building blocks of most Hebrew words. Understanding these many roots is not only a fascinating exercise in linguistic exploration, but is a key step in building a Hebrew vocabulary.

For example, the three-letter root samech-fay-resh (ס פ ר) means “to recount,” or “telling,” as in the sense of telling a story. From this root Hebrew derives a delightful group of words:

ס פ ר = Book
ס ו פ ר = Author/writer/scribe
ס פ ר ו ת = Literature
ס פ ר י ה = Library
ס פ ר ן = Librarian
ס פ ר ו ן= Booklet/pamphlet
ח נ ו ת ס פ ר י ם = Bookstore
בּ י ת ס פ ר = School (lit., “House of [the] Book”
ס פ ו ר = Story
ל ס פ ר = To tell

Tetragrammaton
Tetragrammaton

And like the Metric System, Hebrew employs a series of prefixes that are attached to the words they modify:

ה for “The” “This” or “That”
ו for “And”/”And the”
ל for “To/”To the”
בּ for “In/”In the”/”At”
מ or מִן for “From”/”From the”

The logic of Hebrew is that if you can recognize the root in Hebrew, and learn its meaning, then even when you see a word with that three-letter root that you do not know, you can figure that it must have some logical relationship to the base meaning of that root; in the above case any Hebrew word with the three-letter root samech-fay-resh (ס פ ר) will have some relationship to “recounting” or “telling.”

Read the full article and learn Hebrew at https://blogs.transparent.com/hebrew/hebrew-the-metric-system-of-languages/

 

Posted on

List-Construction as a Task and Resource

The occurrence of lists in natural conversation is examined to reveal some of the interactional relevances of such list productions.

The presence of three-part lists are first noted. Speakers and hearers orient to their three-part nature. The complete list can then constitute a turn at talk and the hearer can monitor the third component as a sign of turn completion.  List can thereby be a conversational sequential source.

By virtue of the three-part structure of some lists, members can orient to such matters as a “weak”, “absent”, or “missing” third part. Third items can be used to accomplish particular interactional work, such as topic-shifting and offense avoidance.

This report is a preliminary examination of lists occurring in natural conversation.

Read List Construction as a Task and Resource

 

Posted on

3,700-year-old Babylonian tablet rewrites the history of maths – and shows the Greeks did not develop trigonometry

plimpton 322 tablet
plimpton 322 tablet

3,700-year-old clay tablet has proven that the Babylonians developed trigonometry 1,500 years before the Greeks and were using a sophisticated method of mathematics which could change how we calculate today.

The tablet, known as Plimpton 332, was discovered in the early 1900s in Southern Iraq by the American archaeologist and diplomat Edgar Banks, who was the inspiration for Indiana Jones.

The true meaning of the tablet has eluded experts until now but new research by the University of New South Wales, Australia, has shown it is the world’s oldest and most accurate trigonometric table, which was probably used by ancient architects to construct temples, palaces and canals. Continue reading 3,700-year-old Babylonian tablet rewrites the history of maths – and shows the Greeks did not develop trigonometry

Posted on

Why Do We Have Middle Names?

BY THE MAG ,BY SEAN HUTCHINSON

AUGUST 26, 2014

Forename, middle name, surname. 

Middle names
Middle names

The phrase “middle name” first appeared in an 1835 Harvard University periodical called Harvardiana, but the practice dates back much further.

In ancient Rome, having multiple names was an honor usually bestowed upon the most important people—like Gaius Julius Caesar. The fad died out only to pick back up again in Western cultures in the 1700s, when aristocrats started giving their children lavishly long names to indicate their place in society. Similarly, lengthy Spanish and Arabic names adopt paternal or maternal names from previous generations to trace the individual’s family tree. (In other cultures, like Chinese, there are traditionally no middle names.)
Continue reading Why Do We Have Middle Names?

Posted on Leave a comment

Trader Joe’s – three bells

Trader Joe's There’s a reason they ring the bell.

You may hear two rings, three rings, another two rings, and then just one.

One ring opens up another register, two means there’s a question at checkout, and three rings requests a manger.
Continue reading Trader Joe’s – three bells

Posted on Leave a comment

Enneagram

Enneagram
Enneagram

The enneagram figure is usually composed of three parts; a circle, an inner triangle (connecting 3-6-9) and an irregular hexagonal “periodic figure” (connecting 1-4-2-8-5-7). According to esoteric spiritual traditions, the circle symbolizes unity, the inner triangle symbolizes the “law of three” and the hexagon represents the “law of seven” (because 1-4-2-8-5-7-1 is the repeating decimal created by dividing one by seven in base 10 arithmetic). These three elements constitute the usual enneagram figure.
Continue reading Enneagram

Posted on Leave a comment

Oxford comma

Why an extra comma matters

Comma
Comma
For those in need of a grammar refresh, the Oxford (or serial) comma is a comma placed between the last two items in a series of three or more. For instance, “I like cake, pizza, and ice cream.”

Proponents of the Oxford comma argue it’s necessary to avoid potential ambiguity.
In the example sentence, it’s clear I like three types of food in and of themselves. Remove it and the sentence reads, “I like cake, pizza and ice cream” — leading to the potential to read the last two items as one combination item. I no longer like pizza and ice cream on their own, one could argue; I like pizza and ice cream only when they’re together. (Not that there’s anything wrong with that.)
Continue reading Oxford comma

Posted on Leave a comment

Number 3 in American Culture

Three American Flags by Jasper Johns

THE NUMBER THREE IN AMERICAN CULTURE

By the late Professor Alan Dundes of the University of California at Berkeley

Allan Dundes

Professor Allan Dundes

Students undertaking professional training in anthropology are rarely, if ever, required to formally study their own cultures. They must demonstrate competence in various topics and areas, but these do not normally include materials from their own cultures. They may be told that the identification and careful delineation of native categories may be crucial to a fuller understanding of that culture which they investigate, but their own native categories, the identification of which is equally important for an understanding of another culture, may not be considered at all. With our present knowledge of the cultural relativity of perception and cognition, it seems clear that students of anthropology should be encouraged to analyze their own native categories with the same care and methodological rigor that is demanded of them in their fieldwork in other cultures. If the reduction of ethnocentric bias is truly an ideal of anthropological scholarship, then anthropologists should go into the field with as comprehensive an understanding of the nature of their own culture as possible.

Continue reading Number 3 in American Culture