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Gentle Giant – Three Friends

Gentle Giant
Gentle Giant - Three Friends
Gentle Giant – Three Friends

Studio Album, released in 1972

Songs / Tracks Listing

  1. Prologue (6:12)
  2. Schooldays (7:33)
  3. Working All Day (5:07)
  4. Peel The Paint (7:25)
  5. Mister Class And Quality? (5:51)
  6. Three Friends (3:00)

Total Time: 35:08

Bonus Tracks on 2011 Alucard remaster:
7. Prologue (Live) (5:53) *
8. Out-Takes (6:21) :
-a Peel The Paint (Studio Rehearsal)
-b Peel The Paint (Alternative Guitar Solo)
-c Three Friends (Soloed Vocal Chorus)

  • Recorded at the Municipal Auditorium, New Orleans, June 1972

Line-up / Musicians

  • Derek Shulman / lead vocals (3-6)
  • Gary Green / guitars (w/ echoplex on track 4 solo), mandolin (2), tambourine (2,5)
  • Kerry Minnear / piano , electric piano, Hammond (1,3-6), Mellotron (2,6), MiniMoog (1,4,6), clavinet (2,3), electric harpsichord & vibraphone (2), bongos triangle (2), lead vocals (2,6)
  • Phil Schulman / tenor (1,3,4) & baritone (1,3) saxes, lead vocals (1,2,4,6)
  • Ray Shulman / bass, fuzz bass (1), acoustic (4) & electric (5) violins, 12-string guitar (1), vocals (6)
  • Malcolm Mortimore / drums, concert snare & hi-hat & bass drum (2)

With:
– Calvin Shulman (Ray’s son) / boy’s voice (2)

Releases information

Artwork: Rick Breach (US editions on Columbia label use an adaptation of 1st album’s cover)

LP Vertigo 6360 070 (1972, UK)
LP Columbia – KC 31649 (1972, USA) Different cover art

CD Columbia ‎- 31649 (1989, US) Different cover art
CD Alucard ‎- ALU-GG-034 (2011, US) Remastered by Fred Kevorkian w/ 2 bonus tracks

 

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Off the rails

Brooklyn rails

 

transport idioms
transport idioms

off the rails. (idiomatic) In an abnormal manner, especially in a manner that causes damage or malfunctioning. (idiomatic) Insane. (idiomatic) Off the intended path. (idiomatic) Out of control.

train wreck
train wreck

Used figuratively for thinness from 1872. To be “off the rails” in a figurative sense is from 1848, an image from the railroads. In U.S. use, “A piece of timber, cleft, hewed, or sawed, inserted in upright posts for fencing” [Webster, 1830].

off the rails by Patrick Corrigan
off the rails by Patrick Corrigan

In an abnormal or malfunctioning condition, as in “Her political campaign has been off the rails for months”. The phrase occurs commonly with go, as in “Once the superintendent resigned, the effort to reform the school system went off the rails”. This idiom alludes to the rails on which trains run; if a train goes off the rails, it stops or crashes. [Mid-1800s]

sources: Google, Wiktionary, Cambridge English

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Three Finger Challenge

Three Finger Challenge Dividing the Internet
The THREE FINGER CHALLENGE Is Dividing The Internet!

 

Inglorious Bastard's
Inglorious Bastard’s

In the movie Inglorious Bastard’s, the spy, undercover as a German officer, orders another round of whiskey, telling the bartender, “Drei Gläser (three glasses) and holding three fingers up — his index, middle, and ring finger. … A true German would have ordered “three” with the index, middle finger, and thumb extended.

three countries using three fingers
three countries using three fingers

The French also start counting with their thumb for one. For two, they hold up the thumb and index finger. For three, they hold up the thumb, index finger and middle finger. In Costa Rica the three finger ‘OK” sign is used. 

Anti Defamation League says 'OK' hand sign not a white supremacist hate symbol
Anti Defamation League says ‘OK’ hand sign not a white supremacist hate symbol

One of America’s oldest civil rights organizations has said it does not think the thumb and forefinger “OK” hand gesture is a white supremacist sign.

The Anti-Defamtion League (ADL) issued the clarification after two journalists known to be supporters of Donald Trump made the sign while standing behind the podium at the White House press briefing room.

The two reporters vehemently denied they were either white supremacists or that they were making a sign in support of such views. However, the image of them sparked a storm on social media, with some commentators arguing that the symbol was a way to indicate ‘white power’, as reported by The Independent.

What’s Trending – Backstage Conversations Shira Lazar
Shira Lazar - Backstage Conversations
Video Sources: Shira Lazar
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Three ways to see an atom

Atom
A remarkable photo of a single atom trapped by electric fields has just been awarded the top prize in a well-known science photography competition. The photo is titled “Single Atom in an Ion Trap” and was shot by David Nadlinger of the University of Oxford
A remarkable photo of a single atom trapped by electric fields has just been awarded the top prize in a well-known science photography competition. The photo is titled “Single Atom in an Ion Trap” and was shot by David Nadlinger of the University of Oxford.

If there is no way in the world to see an atom, then how do we know that the atom is made of protons, electrons, neutrons, the nucleus and the electron cloud?

There are three ways that scientists have proved that these sub-atomic particles exist. They are direct observation, indirect observation or inferred presence and predictions from theory or conjecture.

Atomic model
Atomic model

Scientists in the 1800’s were able to infer a lot about the sub-atomic world from The Periodic Table of Elements by Mendeleyev gave scientists two very important things. The regularity of the table and the observed combinations of chemical compounds prompted some scientists to infer that atoms had regular repeating properties and that maybe they had similar structures.

 

J.J. Thompson
J.J. Thompson

Other scientists studying the discharge effects of electricity in gasses made some direct discoveries. J.J. Thompson was the first to observe and understand the small particles called electrons. These were called cathode rays because they came from the cathode, or negative electrode, of these discharge tubes. It was quickly learned that electrons could be formed into beams and manipulated into images that would ultimately become television. Electrons could also produce something else. Roentgen discovered X-rays in 1895. His discovery was a byproduct of studying electrons. Protons could also be observed directly as well as ions as “anode” rays. These positive particles made up the other half of the atomic world that the chemists had already worked out. The chemists had measured the mass or weight of the elements. The periodic chart and chemical properties proved that there was an atomic number also. This atomic number was eventually identified as the charge of the nucleus or the number of electrons surrounding an atom which is almost always found in a neutral, or balanced, state.

Ernest Rutherford
Ernest Rutherford

Rutherford proved in 1911, that there was a nucleus. He did this directly by shooting alpha particles at other atoms, like gold, and observing that sometimes they bounced back the way they came. There was no way this could be explained by the current picture of the atom which was thought to be a homogeneous mix. Rutherford proved directly by scattering experiments that there was something heavy and solid at the center. The nucleus was discovered. For about 20 years the nucleus was thought to consist of a number of protons to equal the atomic weight and some electrons to reduce the charge so the atomic number came out right. This was very unsettling to many scientists. There were predictions and conjectures that something was missing.

James Chadwick
James Chadwick

In 1932 Chadwick found that a heavy neutral particle was emitted by some radioactive atoms. This particle was about the same mass as a proton, but it had a no electric charge. This was the “missing piece” (famous last words). The nucleus could now be much better explained by using neutrons and protons to make up the atomic weight and atomic number. This made much better sense of the atomic world. There were now electrons equal to the atomic number surrounding the nucleus made up of neutrons and protons.

Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen raggi X
Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen raggi X

Mr. Roentgen’s x-rays allowed scientists to measure the size of the atom. The x-rays were small enough to discern the atomic clouds. This was done by scattering x-rays from atoms and measuring their size just as Rutherford had done earlier by hitting atoms with other nuclei starting with alpha particles.

Cyclotron - 1930 particle accelerator
Cyclotron – 1930 particle accelerator

The 1930’s were also the time when the first practical particle accelerators were invented and used. These early machines made beams of protons. These beams could be used to measure the size of the atomic nucleus. And the search goes on today. Scientists are still filling in the missing pieces in the elementary particle world. Where will it end? Around about 1890, scientists were lamenting the death of physics and pondering a life reduced to measuring the next decimal point! Discoveries made in the 1890’s proved that the surface had only been scratched.

Carbon Atomic Model
Carbon Atomic Model

Each decade of the 1900’s has seen the frontier pushed to smaller and smaller objects. The explosion of knowledge has not slowed down and as each threshold has been passed the amount of new science seems to be greater even as we probe to smaller dimensions. Current theories (if correct) imply that there is even more below the next horizon awaiting discovery

Text Author: Paul Brindza, Experimental Hall A Design Leader

Source: https://education.jlab.org/qa/history_04.html
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Donald Trump – Delegitimize the Media, Whataboutism, Trolling – John Oliver on Last Week Tonight

John Oliver
John Oliver Last Week Tonight
John Oliver Last Week Tonight

John Oliver – Donald Trump

John Oliver on Last Week Tonight discusses how President Donald Trump uses three key divisive issues to control the narrative.

  1. Delegitimize the Media,
  2. Whataboutism,
  3. Trolling
Donald Trump - Delegitimize the Media, Whataboutism, Trolling - John Oliver
Source: HBO Last Week Tonight
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The Three Stooges Slapstick

The Three Stooges
The Three Stooges Columbia Pictures
The Three Stooges Columbia Pictures

Slapstick

Three Stooges revealed
Three Stooges revealed

The Three Stooges’ trademark is their physical comedy. They loved to slap faces! Ted Healy, who started The Stooges, was the first comedian who actually slapped his cohorts around. After The Stooges left Ted Healy’s act, Moe took over the role of leader and did most of the belting, smacking, tweaking and slapping.

You would think that the Stooges would have been hurt in the process, but Moe developed a technique of keeping his fingers loose so that The Boys would not get injured. It was up to the other Stooges then to do the follow-through and make it look as if they had really been smacked. Below are some of the most common slaps, tweaks, and stunts.

Three Stooges Video Playlist

In The beginning

The Three Stooges were founded by a vaudeville performer named Ted Healy
The Three Stooges were founded by a vaudeville performer named Ted Healy

The Three Stooges were founded by a vaudeville performer named Ted Healy in 1925

In the early days of television, movies had to be at least 10 years old (or older) to be shown on the tube. Hollywood was afraid this new-fangled TV thing would put them out of business. So, in the few hours a day that TV was even on, the morning hours were filled with 1930s fare – grainy black-and-white early talkies, serials and shorts – singing cowboysBusby Berkeley musicals, the Little Rascals, and Ted Healy‘s Stooges.

Healy started the Stooges vaudeville act in 1922, and toured the country with them, ending up on Broadway in New York. They started making movies in 1930. From the beginning there were lawsuits over who owned the rights to the stooges. Cast members came and went. More lawsuits came and went. Healy lost a few, but generally won more than he lost. Even his own Stooges sued him.

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Monty Python and the Holy Grail – Bridge – Three Questions

Monty Python Holy Grail

Monty Python

Monty Python and The Holy Grail

Bridgekeeper: Stop. Who would cross the Bridge of Death must answer me these questions three, ere the other side he see.
Sir Lancelot: Ask me the questions, bridgekeeper. I am not afraid.
Bridgekeeper: What… is your name?
Sir Lancelot: My name is Sir Lancelot of Camelot.
Bridgekeeper: What… is your quest?
Sir Lancelot: To seek the Holy Grail.
Bridgekeeper: What… is your favourite colour?
Sir Lancelot: Blue.
Bridgekeeper: Go on. Off you go.
Sir Lancelot: Oh, thank you. Thank you very much.
Sir Robin: That’s easy.
Bridgekeeper: Stop. Who would cross the Bridge of Death must answer me these questions three, ere the other side he see.
Sir Robin: Ask me the questions, bridgekeeper. I’m not afraid.
Bridgekeeper: What… is your name?
Sir Robin: Sir Robin of Camelot.
Bridgekeeper: What… is your quest?
Sir Robin: To seek the Holy Grail.
Bridgekeeper: What… is the capital of Assyria?
[pause]
Sir Robin: I don’t know that.
[he is thrown over the edge into the volcano]
Sir Robin: Auuuuuuuugh.
Bridgekeeper: Stop. What… is your name?
Galahad: Sir Galahad of Camelot.
Bridgekeeper: What… is your quest?
Galahad: I seek the Grail.
Bridgekeeper: What… is your favourite colour?
Galahad: Blue. No, yel…
[he is also thrown over the edge]
Galahad: auuuuuuuugh.
Bridgekeeper: Hee hee heh. Stop. What… is your name?
King Arthur: It is ‘Arthur’, King of the Britons.
Bridgekeeper: What… is your quest?
King Arthur: To seek the Holy Grail.
Bridgekeeper: What… is the air-speed velocity of an unladen swallow?
King Arthur: What do you mean? An African or European swallow?
Bridgekeeper: Huh? I… I don’t know that.
[he is thrown over]
Bridgekeeper: Auuuuuuuugh.
Sir Bedevere: How do know so much about swallows?
King Arthur: Well, you have to know these things when you’re a king, you know.
[the Black Knight continues to threaten Arthur despite getting both his arms and one of his legs cut off]
Black Knight: Right, I’ll do you for that!
King Arthur: You’ll what?

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3-click rule — the magic number – UX Collective

3-click rule — the magic number

A maximum of information in a minimum of words.

UI UX design
UI UX design

This is a particularly deep belief for your graphic designer friends for 10 years, but we have come a long way, and the usability tests have shown it for a while…

I will not lie to you any longer, users of your services will not leave your site or application if they can not find the information they are looking for in 3 clicks.

The number of clicks needed does not affect the success rate and even less the satisfaction of users: the important thing is to have a smooth, easy and understandable navigation (yes, the rules of 3 adjectives affect me too).

The scent of information

The concept is a simple idea and quite primitive as the name suggests : to have a good hunt, you must follow a good smell!

On a website or an application, the smell will take shape with the content, scented with confidence, the right word, the good image.

A little like my previous article about form field (Form fields — Required vs Optional), never forget that the most important thing when designing a product is to give the user the feeling of being in the center of all the expectations.

It’s a bit like setting a trap for a hungry bear, bait him, feed him to your final goal and he will follow you without even realizing it.

The key is your content: put it in value, coated to bring your user to be tempted to immerse himself in it and especially not let him lose The scent of information !

Once lost, the user hesitates, it becomes difficult for him to finish the action, and he will eventually notice the number of clicks you ask him to do.

Do not waste time worrying about the number of clicks, worry about the scent of information.

Disclamer :

I already see the crowd of designer dissatisfied ‘yes that’s fine theory, but when you can do 2 click instead of 6 is better no?’

YES, of course, this article is meant to make you think, to give you concrete information about the different studies done about the 3 clicks rule, but do not get me wrong, when you can do 2 clicks instead of 6 without spoiling the navigation experience, made it, but do not forget The scent of information.

Jordane SamsonJordane Samson
Head of design @gojob - 
#UX provider. For more from jordane sanson and to follow him select the link below: https://medium.com/@JordaneSanson/followers
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Voices from the Dust Bowl The Three Wishes

Voices from the Dust Bowl Camp

This song is called The Three Wishes

Voices from the Dust Bowl : NPR. Voices from the Dust Bowl In 1940, Charles Todd and Robert Sonkin were hired by the Library of Congress to travel around California and record the lives, stories and music of Dust Bowl refugees.

COLLECTION Voices from the Dust Bowl: the Charles L. Todd and Robert Sonkin Migrant Worker Collection, 1940 to 1941

About this Collection

Voices from the Dust Bowl: The Charles L. Todd and Robert Sonkin Migrant Worker Collection is an online presentation of selections from a multi-format ethnographic field collection documenting the everyday life of residents of Farm Security Administration (FSA) migrant work camps in central California in 1940 and 1941.

The collection as a whole consists of approximately 18 hours of audio recordings (436 titles on 122 recording discs), 28 graphic images (prints and negatives), and 1.5 linear feet of print materials including administrative correspondence, field notes, recording logs, song text transcriptions, dust jackets from the recording discs with handwritten notes, news clippings, publications, and ephemera. This online presentation provides access to a selection of items from this collection including 371 audio titles, 23 graphic images, a sampling of the dust jackets, and all the print material in the collection.

Source: Library of Congress - https://www.loc.gov/collections/todd-and-sonkin-migrant-workers-from-1940-to-1941/about-this-collection/
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Three little maids from school are we

Three little maids from school are we
Three Little Maids From School Are We

[YUM-YUM, PEEP-BO & PITTI-SING]
Three little maids from school are we
Pert as a school-girl well can be
Filled to the brim with girlish glee
Three little maids from school!

 

[YUM-YUM]
Everything is a source of fun. (chuckle)

[PEEP-BO]
Nobody’s safe, for we care for none! (chuckle)

[PITTI-SING]
Life is a joke that’s just begun! (chuckle)

[YUM-YUM, PEEP-BO & PITTI-SING]
Three little maids from school!
Three little maids who, all unwary
Come from a ladies’ seminary
Freed from its genius tutelary —
Three little maids from school
Three little maids from school!

[YUM-YUM]
One little maid is a bride, Yum-Yum —

[PEEP-BO]
Two little maids in attendance come —

[PITTI-SING]
Three little maids is the total sum

[YUM-YUM, PEEP-BO & PITTI-SING]
Three little maids from school!

[YUM-YUM]
From three little maids take one away

[PEEP-BO]
Two little maids remain, and they —

[PITTI-SING]
Won’t have to wait very long, they say —

[YUM-YUM, PEEP-BO & PITTI-SING]
Three little maids from school!

[Chorus]
Three little maids from school!

[ALL]
Three little maids who, all unwary
Come from a ladies’ seminary
Freed from its genius tutelary —

[YUM-YUM, PEEP-BO & PITTI-SING]
Three little maids from school!

[ALL]
Three little maids from school!

Note: Just as The Mikado has essentially nothing to do with then-contemporary Japanese culture, thus by no means were these ever intended to be actually based on Japanese names. Yum-yum is obviously “tasty”. Peep-Bo is just an inversion of Bo Peep. And Pitti-Sing is, um, a “pretty thing”.

 

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Three Coins in the Fountain Playlist

Three Coins in A Fountain

Story Line

Three Coins in a Fountain Movie
Three Coins in a Fountain Movie

Three hopeful American secretaries visiting Italy — newcomer Maria (Maggie McNamara), romance-seeking Anita (Jean Peters) and the more mature Frances (Dorothy McGuire) — fling their coins into Rome’s Trevi Fountain, each making a wish. Soon, Maria is pursued by a dashing prince (Louis Jourdan), Anita finds herself involved with a forbidden coworker (Rossano Brazzi), and Frances receives a surprising proposal from her boss (Clifton Webb). All three women vow to one day return to Rome.

History in Rome of throwing three coins in the fountain
The throwing of coins into the Trevi Fountain in Rome is a popular ritual that tourists from all over the globe just love to take part in. The practice of throwing coins in to the Trevi Fountain comes from a couple of legends that explains why so many people are so keen on coin throwing.

 

The first is that the throwing of a coin from the right hand over the left shoulder will ensure that you will return to Rome in the future.
The second legend was the inspiration behind the film ” Three Coins in the Trevi Fountain“. This legend claims that you should throw three coins into the fountain. The first coin guarantees your return to Rome, the second will ensure a new romance, and the third will ensure marriage.The municipality of Rome collects the coins from the Trevi Fountain every day to prevent them from being stolen. They have also created a fund in order to finance a supermarket for the poor people of Rome with the help of Italy’s Red Cross charity.The Trevi Fountain is one of Rome’s most well-known monuments; it became even more famous thanks to the film ” La Dolce Vita”. The entire area around the fountain is steeped in history with incredible architecture. The area is a great place for visitors to stay and there are plenty of accommodation options that will suit all budgets. You can stay in a backpacker hostel or a Rome boutique hotel depending on your needs.

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Three Coins in a Fountain by the Vince Guaraldi Trio

Vince Guaraldi Trio

Vince Guaraldi Trio ‎– Vince Guaraldi Trio

Vince Guaraldi
Vince Guaraldi
  • Label: Fantasy
  • Format: Vinyl, LP, Album, Red
  • VinylCountry: US
  • Released: 1956
  • Genre: Jazz
  • Style: Cool Jazz
Three Coins in the Fountain by the Vince Guaraldi Trio

Story Line

Three Coins in a Fountain Movie
Three Coins in a Fountain Movie

Three hopeful American secretaries visiting Italy — newcomer Maria (Maggie McNamara), romance-seeking Anita (Jean Peters) and the more mature Frances (Dorothy McGuire) — fling their coins into Rome’s Trevi Fountain, each making a wish. Soon, Maria is pursued by a dashing prince (Louis Jourdan), Anita finds herself involved with a forbidden coworker (Rossano Brazzi), and Frances receives a surprising proposal from her boss (Clifton Webb). All three women vow to one day return to Rome.