Category Archives: Art – Design

We use threes in art to define structures like primary, secondary and tertiary colors on a color wheel. Sir Isaac Newton developed the first color wheel in 1666. The three Greek column classifications are Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian.

Pool ball colors

pool ball colors
pool ball colors

Three primary colors:
1 & 9 = Yellow (primary)
2 & 10 = Blue (primary)
3 & 11 = Red (primary)

Three secondary colors:
4 & 12 = Purple (blue+red)
5 & 13 = Orange (red+yellow)
6 & 14 = Green (yellow+blue)

One tertiary color:
7 & 15 = Maroon (purple+red)

Two all-or-nothing colors:
8 = Black
Cue = White

Source: http://billiards.colostate.edu/threads/balls.html

SCYLLA (Skulla) and Charybdis

SKYLLA Museum Collection: Musée du Louvre, Paris, France Catalogue Number: TBA Beazley Archive Number: N/A Ware: (Lucanian?) Red Figure Shape: Krater Painter: -- Date: ca 450 - 425 BC Period: Classical
SKYLLA
Museum Collection: Musée du Louvre, Paris, France
Catalogue Number: TBA
Beazley Archive Number: N/A
Ware: (Lucanian?) Red Figure
Shape: Krater
Painter: —
Date: ca 450 – 425 BC
Period: Classical

the names of two rocks between Italy and Sicily, and only a short distance from one another. In the midst of the one of these rocks which was nearest to Italy, there dwelt, according to Homer, Scylla, a daughter of Crataeis, a fearful monster, barking like a dog, with twelve feet, six long necks and mouths, each of which contained three rows of sharp teeth. The opposite rock, which was much lower, contained an immense fig-tree, under which there dwelt Charybdis, who thrice every day swallowed down the waters of the sea, and thrice threw them up again : both were formidable to the ships which had to pass between them (Hom. Od.xii. 73, &c., 235, &c.). Later traditions represent Scylla as a daughter of Phorcys or Phorbas, by Hecate Crataeis (Apollon. Rhod. iv. 828, &c., with the Scholiast), or by Lamia; while others make her a daughter of Triton, or Poseidon and Crataeis (Eustath.ad Hom. p. 1714), or of Typhon and Echidna (Hygin. Fab. praef.). Some, again, describe her as a monster with six heads of different animals, or with only three heads (Tzetz. ad Lycoph. 650 ; Eustath. l. c.).  Continue reading SCYLLA (Skulla) and Charybdis

lighting

3 – Light It Separately. Another important, but often overlooked, essential is lighting your subject independently of your set. This is important for two “key” reasons: shadows and reflections. Part of keeping your wall evenly lit is keeping your subject’s shadow from falling across it. To do this you need to position the talent at a distance of at least a few feet from the screen, and light him separately using three point lighting.

lighting

If you do not have a lot of distance to work with, position your key & fill lights slightly to the sides, not straight on, so any resulting shadows will fall outside the visible frame. Another advantage of moving your subject away from the wall is the reduction of reflected green spill light on your talent. Reflected spill light can rim your subject in a tinted halo that can be difficult to discern with the naked eye, but if your actor is too close to your wall, it will be there, and any green bouncing off your actor will mess up the cleanliness of your key. You can wash away a fair amount of reflected green using a bright backlight, but you will find that distance is your best friend.

Triangle, Square, Circle: A Psychological Test

1. Fill in these three forms with one of the the primary colors: red, yellow, or blue. The coloring is to fill the form entirely in each case. One color per shape.

triangle circle square

2. If possible, provide an explanation for your choice of color.

 

In 1923 Wassily Kandinsky circulated a questionnaire at the Bauhaus, asking respondents to fill in a triangle, square, and circle witht he primary colors of red, yellow, and blue. He hoped to discover a universal correspondence between form and color, embodied in the equation red=square, yellow=triangle, blue=circle.

 

Continue reading Triangle, Square, Circle: A Psychological Test